Madison Ann
A Morning without Coffee...

Phishing and a near miss scam

My daughter found a car on "craigslist" and wanted to buy it. she called to ask my advice (after emailing them about it) and the second she told me they wanted a Wire transfer of money from Western Union, I KNEW it was a SCAM and she would NEVER see the car or her money!

It brought me to this post about phishing-   those emails asking you for your personal info to verify your account....  well please, please, please, read this article from the FTC website

You MAY already know about this but would you please re read this and then be sure that you share this with your friends, family and elderly and TEENAGERS!  After what just happened and Katie calling me for advice, it made me realize that we must educate our loved ones!!  Now I am off to actaully get to my studio for some serious creating-  UGH what a morning this has been! Thank goodness she called me about it or it would have been a hot mess! Oh and get this-  that person some supposid woman emailed me back and called me names! I sent "her" (ya right) a copy of the craigst list scam notice as well as the ebay one and said- you have been reported to the FBI, Craigs list, Ebay and the FTC- so who is the "retard" now! roflol

Phishing

Quick Facts

Phishing is a scam where internet fraudsters send spam or pop-up messages to lure personal and financial information from unsuspecting victims. To avoid getting hooked:

  • Don't reply to email or pop-up messages that ask for personal or financial information, and don't click on links in the message. Don't cut and paste a link from the message into your Web browser — phishers can make links look like they go one place, but that actually send you to a different site.
  • Some scammers send an email that appears to be from a legitimate business and ask you to call a phone number to update your account or access a "refund." Because they use Voice over Internet Protocol technology, the area code you call does not reflect where the scammers really are. If you need to reach an organization you do business with, call the number on your financial statements or on the back of your credit card.
  • Use anti-virus and anti-spyware software, as well as a firewall, and update them all regularly.
  • Don't email personal or financial information.
  • Review credit card and bank account statements as soon as you receive them to check for unauthorized charges.
  • Be cautious about opening any attachment or downloading any files from emails you receive, regardless of who sent them.
  • Forward phishing emails to spam@uce.gov – and to the company, bank, or organization impersonated in the phishing email. You also may report phishing email to reportphishing@antiphishing.org. The Anti-Phishing Working Group, a consortium of ISPs, security vendors, financial institutions and law enforcement agencies, uses these reports to fight phishing.
  • If you've been scammed, visit the Federal Trade Commission's Identity Theft website at ftc.gov/idtheft.

How Not To Get Hooked by a "Phishing" Scam

"We suspect an unauthorized transaction on your account. To ensure that your account is not compromised, please click the link below and confirm your identity."

"During our regular verification of accounts, we couldn't verify your information. Please click here to update and verify your information."

Have you received email with a similar message? It's a scam called "phishing" — and it involves internet fraudsters who send spam or pop-up messages to lure personal information (credit card numbers, bank account information, Social Security number, passwords, or other sensitive information) from unsuspecting victims.

According to OnGuard Online, phishers send an email or pop-up message that claims to be from a business or organization that you may deal with — for example, an Internet Service Provider (ISP), bank, online payment service, or even a government agency. The message may ask you to "update," "validate," or "confirm" your account information. Some phishing emails threaten a dire consequence if you don't respond. The messages direct you to a website that looks just like a legitimate organization's site. But it isn't. It's a bogus site whose sole purpose is to trick you into divulging your personal information so the operators can steal your identity and run up bills or commit crimes in your name.

OnGuard Online suggests these tips to help you avoid getting hooked by a phishing scam:

  • If you get an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial information, do not reply. And don't click on the link in the message, either. Legitimate companies don't ask for this information via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the organization mentioned in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new internet browser session and type in the company's correct Web address yourself. In any case, don't cut and paste the link from the message into your internet browser — phishers can make links look like they go to one place, but that actually send you to a different site.
  • Area codes can mislead. Some scammers send emails that appear to be from a legitimate business and ask you to call a phone number to update your account or access a "refund." Because they use Voice over Internet Protocol technology, the area code you call does not reflect where the scammers really are. If you need to reach an organization you do business with, call the number on your financial statements or on the back of your credit card. And delete any emails that ask you to confirm or divulge your financial information.
  • Use anti-virus and anti-spyware software, as well as a firewall, and update them all regularly. Some phishing emails contain software that can harm your computer or track your activities on the internet without your knowledge.

Anti-virus software and a firewall can protect you from inadvertently accepting such unwanted files. Anti-virus software scans incoming communications for troublesome files. Look for anti-virus software that recognizes current viruses as well as older ones; that can effectively reverse the damage; and that updates automatically.

A firewall helps make you invisible on the internet and blocks all communications from unauthorized sources. It's especially important to run a firewall if you have a broadband connection. Operating systems (like Windows or Linux) or browsers (like Internet Explorer or Netscape) also may offer free software "patches" to close holes in the system that hackers or phishers could exploit.

  • Don't email personal or financial information. Email is not a secure method of transmitting personal information. If you initiate a transaction and want to provide your personal or financial information through an organization's website, look for indicators that the site is secure, like a lock icon on the browser's status bar or a URL for a website that begins "https:" (the "s" stands for "secure"). Unfortunately, no indicator is foolproof; some phishers have forged security icons.
  • Review credit card and bank account statements as soon as you receive them to check for unauthorized charges. If your statement is late by more than a couple of days, call your credit card company or bank to confirm your billing address and account balances.
  • Be cautious about opening any attachment or downloading any files from emails you receive, regardless of who sent them. These files can contain viruses or other software that can weaken your computer's security.
  • Forward phishing emails to spam@uce.gov – and to the company, bank, or organization impersonated in the phishing email. Most organizations have information on their websites about where to report problems. You also may report phishing email to reportphishing@antiphishing.org. The Anti-Phishing Working Group, a consortium of ISPs, security vendors, financial institutions and law enforcement agencies, uses these reports to fight phishing.
  • If you believe you've been scammed, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov/complaint, and then visit the FTC's identity theft website at ftc.gov/idtheft.Victims of phishing can become victims of identity theft. While you can't entirely control whether you will become a victim of identity theft, you can take some steps to minimize your risk. If an identity thief is opening credit accounts in your name, these new accounts are likely to show up on your credit report. You may catch an incident early if you order a free copy of your credit report periodically from any of the three major credit reporting companies. See www.annualcreditreport.com for details on ordering a free annual credit report.

Learn other ways to avoid email scams and deal with deceptive spam at ftc.gov/spam.

How to Report a Phishing Scam

If you've received spam that is phishing for information:

  • Forward it to spam@uce.gov – and to the company, bank, or organization impersonated in the phishing email. Most organizations have information on their websites about where to report problems.

If you believe you've been scammed:

  • File a report with the Federal Trade Commission at www.ftc.gov/complaint.
  • Report it to your state Attorney General, using contact information at naag.org.
  • Then visit the FTC's identity theft website at ftc.gov/idtheft. While you can't completely control whether you will become a victim of identity theft, you can take some steps to minimize your risk.
  • You also may report phishing email to reportphishing@antiphishing.org. The Anti-Phishing Working Group, a consortium of ISPs, security vendors, financial institutions and law enforcement agencies, uses these reports to fight phishing.

http://www.onguardonline.gov/topics/phishing.aspx

and from ebay-

Directly from EBAY’s official website

Avoid:

  • Paying with instant money transfer services such as Western Union and MoneyGram that send cash instantly from storefront locations, by telephone, and over the Internet. These payment methods are not accepted on eBay.
  • Transactions where the seller only accepts cash (except in-person transactions).
  • Unsolicited offers. Don't respond to offers to sell you the item directly without bidding on and winning the item on eBay. These are "off-eBay" transactions and aren't eligible for buyer protection.
  • Fake escrow services. Use caution when considering an escrow service to pay for your item. For eBay transactions in the U.S., only use www.escrow.com.

http://contact.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ContactUsNextGen

If this weren't so VERY important I would not have shared the entire thing-

Please educate your loved ones!!!

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